link to Prof. Stein's home page
 #List of Web Pages for this and other courses

COURSES:
link to ISS 325 War and Revolution syllabus
link to PLS 364 International Organization syllabus
link to PLS 461 Refugees syllabus

ISS325--WAR & REVOLUTION syllabus page


ISS325--WAR & REVOLUTION
 INTEGRATIVE STUDIES in SOCIAL SCIENCE 325
Spring 2004 ISS 325/section 6

PROFESSOR BARRY N. STEIN
345 South Kedzie Hall
Michigan State University
355-1881 or 355-9733
stein@msu.edu
Homepage: http://www.msu.edu/user/stein/index.htm

 WAR AND REVOLUTION
Spring 2004


REQUIRED TEXTS:

1. Greene, Comparative Revolutionary Movements, 3rd Edition

2. Ziegler, War, Peace and International Politics, 8th Edition

3. The New York Times [daily, Monday 2 Feb to Friday 26 March 2004; no paper 8-12 March 2004]

4. War and Revolution - Hyperpower; War Against Terrorism. [Hyperpower]

Required Course Readings. Two options:

4a. Foreign Affairs Custom Anthology; at Student Book Store [SBS] OR

4b. Foreign Affairs readings on INTERNET at

http://www.msu.edu/course/iss/325/stein/read-325-1.htm



RECOMMENDED READING: Two options:

5a. COURSE PACK [CP]: [2003 Overhead Projections and three required readings] at Student Book Store. OR

5b. Electronic COURSE PACK [2003 Overhead Projections and three required readings] on INTERNET at: http://www.msu.edu/course/iss/325/stein/325lecture.htm

The New York Times is available in the library or at local newsstands and coin boxes for $1.00 per copy. It is also available by subscription for the period indicated above. The subscription cost is $14.00 for five copies per week (40 cents per copy) for seven weeks over an eight week period. Subscription forms will be handed out and collected in class. Fill in your name and LOCAL ADDRESS, fill in credit card information or attach a check [to: New York Times]. DO NOT MAIL IT. Hand it in at class or at my office on or before Thursday 29 JANUARY

The paper will be delivered to your dorm or local address in the morning. Some students will get the paper from a locked box in South Kedzie Hall. NEW YORK TIMES assignments are posted directly to you on PILOT email TROUBLE: If during the term you have difficulties with delivery - IMMEDIATELY contact GENOVA NEWS at 349-5029 between 8:00am and NOON.

TESTS: we will have SEVEN tests this term. There will be six short bi-weekly tests plus a comprehensive final exam. All of the short tests will have 30 questions each; the final will have 80 questions and will cover the entire term's work. The short tests will focus on the assignments and lectures since the last test, but may have questions from earlier in the course. Approximately five to eight questions on each bi-weekly will be on assigned stories in The New York Times from the Monday to Friday, for one or two weeks, preceding the test. The remaining 22 to 25 questions will be evenly SPLIT between lecture material and the reading assignments. The final will emphasize readings and lectures and will have no questions from the newspaper.
TEST SCHEDULE AND READING ASSIGNMENTS
Test 1: 3 Feb Hyperpower Readings 1 & 3-10 [pp. 1-21 & 49-166]; & Kagan, [CP 269-297]. http://www.msu.edu/course/iss/325/stein/policyreviewarticles.html

Test 2: 17 Feb Hyperpower Reading 2 & 11-12 [pp. 23-47 & 167-208]; Ziegler, Introduction & Chaps. 1-6; & NY Times.

Test 3: 2 March Ziegler, Chapters 7-9, and 20; Greene, Chapters 1-7; & NY Times.

Test 4: 23 March Greene, Chapter 8 to Appendix; ; & NY Times.

Test 5: 6 April Ziegler, Chapter 14; Hyperpower Readings 13-19 [pp. 209-291]; & NY Times.

Test 6: 20 April Ziegler, Chapters 10-13, and 15-19.

All six short tests are on Tuesday at the START OF CLASS. BRING your own PENCILS. DANGER ENTRY TO TESTS CLOSES WHEN THE FIRST TEST IS HANDED IN. THIS USUALLY OCCURS AFTER 9 TO 11 MINUTES.  Late arrivals will get a ZERO for that test.
FINAL examination is Tuesday, May 4, 2004 - 12:45-2:45 p.m.

GRADES: You will be GRADED on the basis of your FOUR BEST BI-WEEKLY tests plus the FINAL exam. Because you can drop two of the bi-weekly tests, there will be NO MAKE-UP provision. [The dropped tests are meant to cover all absences including religious observances, illness, family matters, or just a bad hair day.] You will be graded on the basis of a possible 220 points:

Each bi-weekly test is therefore 13.6% of your final grade, the final counts for 36.4% of the grade, and attendance for 9%. Grades will be assigned according to the following TENTATIVE scale:

Short Exams 4 Best Final Exam Attendance Final Grades

[90%] 4.0 = 27+ x4= 108 72 20 200 points

[85%] 3.5 = 25.5 x4= 102 68 20 190 points

[80%] 3.0 = 24 x4= 96 64 20 180 points

[75%] 2.5 = 22.5 x4= 90 60 20 170 points

[70%] 2.0 = 21 x4= 84 56 20 160 points

[65%] 1.5 = 19.5 x4= 78 52 20 150 points

[60%] 1.0 = 18 x4= 72 48 20 140 points

NOTE:  This scale is tentative; it may be changed.  If it is changed, the scale will be made easier, not harder.
           

FRIENDLY ADVICE: You will find the short tests RELATIVELY EASY because the material will be FRESH in your mind.  For similar reasons, the FINAL will be RELATIVELY DIFFICULT because the material is weeks old and other finals are competing for your time.  You are advised to PILE ON THE POINTS ON THE WEEKLY EXAMS.
A WORD TO THE WISE: because you can DROP A TEST there is a TEMPTATION to skip an EARLY TEST for reasons that seem good at the time.  BUT LATE IN THE TERM, THINGS HAPPEN: people get sick, miss planes or trains, cars break down, suffer personal or family problems, ... For your own sake, drag yourself in, please don't skip a test until you have four in the bag. ATTENDANCE is required and demanded, checked & rewarded or penalized

CUTTING CLASSES WILL INEVITABLY PENALIZE YOU because a substantial part of each short test will focus on lecture material, WITH A SPECIAL EMPHASIS ON THE SECOND HOUR. You are responsible for complying with all announcements made in class and for taking all tests and for all assignments, whether or not they have been announced in advance. 



ATTENDANCE POINTS [note: you must scan in between 10:00am and 11:00am]

Attendance will be taken by scanner at the start of each class--use your MSU student ID card. Scanning will begin on Tuesday 27 January, after the close of drops and adds. YOU WILL EARN ONE POINT FOR EACH DAY OF ATTENDANCE UP TO A MAXIMUM OF TWENTY POINTS.

Attendance points are GRADE-NEUTRAL if you get 20 or more points and

GRADE-NEGATIVE if you get fewer than 20 points. [you have 26 opportunities to get 20 points.]

NOTE: additional attendance spot checks, at the end of class, will be made during the term. Those in attendance will receive a bonus point; those students who are not in attendance will be PENALIZED and will lose one regular attendance point.

OFFICE HOURS: Wednesday from 9:00am to 11:00am, and Friday from 9:00am to 10:00am; or BY APPOINTMENT. My office is 345 South Kedzie, phone 355-1881. Besides the posted office hours I am generally available on Tuesday and Thursday after class to roughly 3:something; and Monday, Wednesday Friday from 8:00am to roughly 3:30 or 4:something; please phone first to check or to make an appointment. Feel free to drop in to chat or argue about anything connected with the course, or almost anything else. My email is stein@msu.edu. Use it to ask questions, make comments, check on details.

TEACHING ASSISTANT: The T.A. for this class is Yael Shomer. Yael will have primary responsibility for office hours, running voluntary discussion sessions, and managing the attendance lists. Her office is in 209 South Kedzie Hall, office hours are Monday from 12 to 1 , phone number is 432-2622, and Email is <shomerya@msu.edu>. The discussion section will meet Monday between 1:40 and 2:40 in 135 N. Kedzie.

FILMS:
Thursday 29 January 2004 - Freedom Now

Thursday 12 February 2004 - Interviews with My Lai Veterans and Guerrilla Wars

Thursday 26 February 2004 - Triumph of Evil

Thursday 25 March 2004 - Red Flag

Thursday 8 April 2004 - People Power

Thursday 10 April 2003 - No Place to Hide




ISS 325 WAR AND REVOLUTION HOMEPAGE on INTERNET at:
http://www.msu.edu/course/iss/325/stein/iss325.htm


 MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION

    Keep copies of each test, they are very valuable for studying for the final.   Copies of two of LAST YEAR'S SHORT TESTS, without the answers, are at http://www.msu.edu/course/iss/325/stein/325lecture-oldtests.htm
     Basic study hint: go over the questions you have missed.  Find it in the readings or lecture notes.  What is the key point, how does the correct answer differ from your choice.  Many concepts will be repeated throughout the term; don't miss the same concept more than once.  LOSING A POINT

    Your NAME and STUDENT NUMBER must be filled in correctly on each test.  ERRORS WILL COST YOU ONE POINT TO REPAIR. You will feel silly if you lose a point, and perhaps a higher grade, because you don't know your own name & #.
     TEST RULES:

     YOU MUST KEEP YOUR ANSWER SHEET COVERED AT ALL TIMES. YOU WILL MAKE NO MARKS ON THE QUESTION BOOKLET OTHER THAN YOUR NAME AND STUDENT NUMBER, no circling of numbers, checks or X's, underlining, or numbers that will indicate your answer to someone else.
     However, at the end of each test you may write your answers on a separate sheet of paper for checking at the Learning Resources Center.
    After you finish a test and hand it in; PLEASE LEAVE THE ROOM.  This is a courtesy to the students who have not finished and who deserve a quiet test environment.  ACADEMIC DISHONESTY:

 According to the Spartan Life Handbook "all academic work will be done by the student to whom it is assigned, without unauthorized aid of any kind."  "If any instance of academic dishonesty is discovered by an instructor, he or she may give a failing grade to the student for the course."  "The instructor will notify the student's academic dean in writing of the circumstances."  Class pattern:

     On test days, the test will be at the start of the period and will take about 40 minutes [thirty to thirty-five minutes for the test and five minutes to return to the room].  Class will begin again at about 1:20 and run without a break until 2:20.
     On other [non-test] days, class will run until around 1:30, then we will take a 10 minute break during which the test results of the previous test will be returned to you, then we will resume until 2:30.
         NOTE:  if you return to the classroom after a test or after the break on non-test days you are expected and required to STAY UNTIL THE END OF CLASS.  I know two hours is a long time after lunch, BUT it is very disruptive if people try to filter out in the last few minutes of class and it WILL NOT BE PERMITTED.  If you have to leave early, please speak to me. TEST QUESTIONS

     All questions require you to SELECT THE BEST ANSWER.  That means that several answers may be partially or fully correct.  Think in terms of a question where the correct answer is "all of the above."  Each foil is correct but the "best" answer is all.  On other questions, less-best answers may be too narrow, half-true, correct but for a different question, or simply not as important as the best answer.  The point of best answers is to test your ability to understand and apply concepts, principles, definitions, abstractions, analytical frameworks, models, and the like.

     For the textbooks, most questions will be based on the sub-chapter headings.   For example, Greene, part II - Characteristics, chapter 4 - Leaders:  What is the social class of revolutionary leaders?  How do Bourgeois Revolutionaries differ from revolutionaries on the Right [Left]?  What are the characteristics of student revolutionaries? [or intellectuals as revolutionaries? Bourgeois Revolutionaries? Left? Right?]  At the end of most chapters in Greene there are 'PROPOSITIONS' AND 'HYPOTHESES' FOR FURTHER TESTING; I think they make good questions.
          For example, Ziegler, chapter 3 -  The Cold War and the Korean War:  Define Cold War?  What is Limited War?  How was the Truman Doctrine different from the Marshall Plan?  What is Bipolarity?  What was the main cause of the Korean War?  Which of the following was not a cause of the Korean War?  Which of the following is not an example of limited war.
     LECTURE QUESTIONS: The electronic COURSE PACK WILL HELP YOU follow the organization of the lectures and take notes more easily, HOWEVER, the PACK IS DESIGNED TO BE TOO SKETCHY TO BE SUFFICIENT FOR TESTS.  The pack is designed so that it will help you deal with the lectures; it is not a substitute for being here.  Think of the material in the lecture notes as HEADLINES or as SUB-CHAPTER HEADINGS and you fill in the text during class.  FEEDBACK SHEETS

After each test you will receive a feedback sheet with information about the test and about your grades.
a) check that your name and # are correct.  To the right of your student # is RAW SCORE which is your grade on this test.  Ignore the STANDARD SCORE, it doesn't matter.  PERCENTILE indicates your class position; i.e., 92 is top 8%; 25 is bottom quarter.
b) questions are displayed as follows:
001- 4  2   :  002- 3     : 003- 4      :  004- 1  4  :
this would mean that you answered #4 for question 1 but the correct answer was #2, you got questions 2 and 3 correct, and the right answer for question 4 was #4.



ATTENDANCE BONUS & WARNING:

     THE LAST TIME I TAUGHT THIS COURSE I FLUNKED 45 OF 426 STUDENTS.  THE CLASS GPA WAS DISTURBINGLY LOWER THAN MY NORMAL GPA OF 2.65+.  THE DIFFERENCE WAS CLASS ATTENDANCE.
     AT SEVERAL RANDOM POINTS DURING THE TERM, I CHECK ON ATTENDANCE AT THE VERY END OF A CLASS SESSION.   LAST SPRING, I DID THIS 3 TIMES DURING THE TERM.  [I give extra points for those attendance points.]
     FOR THE 100 WEAKEST STUDENTS, AVERAGE ATTENDANCE WAS 1.072 OUT OF 3.0.
     FOR THE 100 BEST STUDENTS, AVERAGE ATTENDANCE WAS 2.314 OUT OF 3.0.
     THERE WERE 20 STUDENTS WHO FLUNKED THE COURSE BUT WERE WITHIN REACH OF A 1.0 IF THEY HAD ENOUGH EXTRA ATTENDANCE POINTS.  ONLY 4 OF 20 MADE IT.  [12 OF THOSE 20 HAD NONE OF THE ATTENDANCE POINTS.]
     THERE WERE 15 STUDENTS WITH 3.5 BUT WITHIN REACH OF A 4.0.  9 OF THE 15 WERE RAISED TO A 4.0.  NONE OF THE 15 3.5 STUDENTS HAD NO ATTENDANCE POINTS.



stein@msu.edu
home page
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list of pages

* link to Prof. Stein's home page

COURSES:
link to ISS 325 War and Revolution syllabus
link to PLS 364 International Organization syllabus
link to PLS 461 Refugees syllabus

ISS 325 War & Revolution pages:
link to Failed/Rogue Readings for Test 1 page
link to Failed/Rogue Readings for Test 2 page
link to Failed/Rogue Readings for Test 5 page
link to Policy Review Articles for Test 1 page
link to War & Revolution photo page
link to AGGRESSION page
link to ARMS CONTROL & DISARMAMENT page
link to IRAQ-BOMB-98 page
link to NATIONALISM and ETHNIC CONFLICT page
link to PROTRACTED INTERNAL WAR page
link to REVOLUTION & INTERNAL CONFLICT page
link to WAR page
link to Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism page
link to AFRICA: GREAT LAKES page
link to Globalization page
link to 325email-1 archive page
link to attendance record page

ISS 325 War & Revolution lecture pages:
Table of Contents
Introduction: Relationships and Processes
States/Weak States/Sovereignty/Blood
Just War/War Crimes/Genocide
Human Aggression
Conquest/Authority
Ethnic Conflict/Nationalism
Revolution/Internal Conflict
War/Threat/Aggression
U.N./Peacekeeping/Humanitarian Intervention
Nuclear Weapons/Weapons of Mass Destruction
Syllabus and Course Information
Old Tests 2000/1, 2000/3

PLS 364 International Organizations & Cooperation pages:
link to UNITED NATIONS & International Organizations page
link to War Crimes page
link to European Institutions page
link to PLS364 readings on International Law
link to PLS364 readings on UN Reform and Budget
link to PLS364 readings on International Law and the Use of Force
 

PLS 461 Refugees, Displaced Persons, Exiles pages:
link to Refugees, DPs, Exiles photo page
link to KOSOVO: Ethnic Cleansing redux page
link to paper: The Refugee Experience
link to paper: Older Refugee Settlements in Africa
link to paper: Repatriation Under Conflict
link to 1996 paper: Regional Efforts to Address Refugee Problems in the Developing World
link to 1997 paper: Regional Efforts to Address Refugee Problems
link to paper: Refugee Repatriation, Return and Refoulement During Conflict 1997



stein@pilot.msu.edu
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