Keynote Speaker

Professor Helen Longino

Dr. Helen Longino received her PhD from Johns Hopkins University. Her teaching and research interests are in philosophy of science, social epistemology, and feminist philosophy. Dr. Longino is the author of Science As Social Knowledge (Princeton University Press, 1990), The Fate of Knowledge (Princeton University Press, 2001), and many articles in the philosophy of science, feminist philosophy and epistemology.

In her recent book The Fate of Knowledge, Dr. Longino presents a constructive account of how to overcome the dichotomy between those who see science as rational and those who see it as the product of social forces. Contributing as well to the development of pluralistic theories of science, Longino constructs a meaningful concept of knowledge in the face of theoretical plurality and uncertainty.

Following the link below will enable you to listen to a 2004 radio interview with Dr. Longino.

http://www.philosophytalk.org/pastShows/TruthandRelativism.htm

Recently holding positions at the University of Minnesota in the Philosophy Department, Women’s Studies Department, and the Minnesota Center for the Philosophy of Science, Dr. Longino is currently Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Stanford University.

We are extremely pleased to have Dr. Helen Longino as the keynote speaker for the 7th Annual Graduate Student Philosophy Conference, February 17 – 18, 2006.


Featured Faculty Speaker

Professor Lisa Schwartzman

Lisa H. Schwartzman, Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony Brook, (Feminist Theory, Social and Political Philosophy, Ethics) is the author of Challenging Liberalism: Feminism as Political Critique (forthcoming from Penn State Press, 2006) and co-editor of Feminist Interventions in Ethics and Politics (Rowman and Littlefield, 2005). She has also published essays on feminist analyses of rights, equality, and hate speech. Her ongoing research involves examining the way that central liberal concepts, such as neutrality and choice, function in the context of oppressive social structures.

Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Michigan State University, Dr. Schwartzman is active in many organizations, councils and initiatives involving women’s issues and social justice.

We are very pleased that Professor Lisa Schwartzman will be the featured faculty speaker at the 7th Annual Graduate Student Philosophy Conference, February 17 – 18, 2006.