CHANGE IN EXAM DATE: FOURTH EXAM HAS BEEN MOVED FROM MONDAY APRIL 8TH TO WED APRIL 10TH  IT WILL STILL COVER CHAPTERS 13 (Deserts and Winds) 14 (Shorelines) 15 (Crustal Deformation) 16 (Earthquakes) & 17 (The Earth's Interior)

 

   THE FINAL EXAM WILL BE ON MONDAY, APRIL 29TH FROM 3:00-5:00 PM IN ROOM 128 NATURAL SCIENCES, THE REGULAR CLASSROOM

IT WILL COVER  

Chapter 18, the Ocean Floor;  

Chapter 19 Plate Tectonics;  

Chapter 20 Mountain Building and the Evolution of Continents  

and Chapter 21 Energy and Mineral resources.  

CHAPTER 22, THE PLANETS WILL NOT BE COVERED or be on the exam

I am frequently asked the question ' will the final exam be comprehensive ' ? When we cover these last 4 chapters many terms will crop up that were first covered in earlier chapters, for instance the type of rock that makes up the continents and ocean floors were covered in Chapter 3. The types of volcanoes associated with plate margins were covered in Chapter 4. When these and other terms crop up in the final chapters make sure you know what they mean. That is all I mean by comprehensive, I will not ask detailed questions from the earlier chapters.

IF YOU ARE HAVING DIFFICULTY WITH THE MATERIAL CONTACT ME AS SOON AS YOU DISCOVER THE PROBLEM,

DO NOT WAIT UNTIL THE LAST WEEK TO REVIEW IT

Leah Smith, a member of our class, e-mailed the following web sites to me.  They will be useful for those of you interested in reading more about NO TILL farming practices. I introduced the idea during the lecture on soils but only gave a very brief account.  These sites give a much more in depth view of the subject.

                       
                http://www.ianr.unl.edu/pubs/fieldcrops/g1046.htm#tsd
                http://agguide.agronomy.psu.edu/sect4/sec44b.htm
                http://www.mandakzerotill.org/adart02.html
                http://corn.agronomy.wisc.edu/FISC/Corn/Tillage.htm
 
                                                                Leah Smith
                                                                GLG 201
               

c:\progra~1\qualcomm\eudora\attach\css210honor.doc css210honor.doc

 

The Dynamic Earth   GLG-201  Spring 2002

Instructor: Prof. F. William Cambray
106, Natural Sciences.    Phone 5-9568.     email  cambray@pilot   http://www.msu.edu/~cambray/
Office Hours: Monday 5:00-6:00PM and Wednesday 9:00-10:00AM in 106 Nat. Sci. and by appointment.

Teaching Assistants:

Section 4&6 Jen McGuire, Coordinator 8, Nat.Sci.    ph 353-3988 mcguir20@msu.edu
    Office Hours: Tues. 1:00-3:00 PM & Wed. 9:00-11:00
Section 1,2&3 Jennifer Wade,  7, Nat. Sci.   ph 355-0735  jwade@msu.edu
    Office Hours: Wed.10:00-12:00 AM, Thu. 1:30 PM-3:00 PM
Section 5  Erin Rasmussson,  7, Nat. Sci.    ph 355-0735    rasmusso@msu.edu 
    Office Hours: Tue. 10:20-12:20 AM, Thu.10:20-12:20

Text: Earth, an introduction to Physical Geology.
            Tarbuck and Lutgens, seventh edition.
            ( see lab. section below for other texts)

Scheduled Class times: Mon.& Wed.  3:00 PM-4:20 PM 

Room 128 Natural Sciences Building

OUTLINE:

 The course will be divided into five parts with an examination following each part.
Each exam is comprehensive in that an understanding of the new material depends on a knowledge of the previous topics.  Of the four examinations during the regular semester the lowest grade will be dropped.  If you are unable to attend one of these exams for any reason this will be the one to be dropped.

THERE ARE NO MAKE-UPS

Part 1. Introduction and Earth Materials, Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4 and part of Ch. 19(pages 530-544)

Topics will include:
        The nature of science, examples of the method of inquiry
        Origin of the earth and  its chemical composition
        Mineral compositions and structures.
http://tech-two.mit.edu/Chemicool/
Check out this web site for a good explanation of the Periodic Table

        The origin and classification of igneous rocks
        Volcanic and plutonic activity
FIRST TEST: Monday,  January 28th. 

Part 2. Weathering, sedimentary rocks, metamorphic rocks and deep time.
chapters 5, 6, 7 and 8.

Topics will include:
        The physical and chemical changes that affect rocks at the earth's surface.
        Weathering, Soils and sedimentary rocks. (see web sites at the top of the page)
        Metamorphism.
        Estimating the relative age of rocks and determining numerical ages.

SECOND TEST:   NOTE CHANGE TO WEDNESDAY FEB. 20TH (from Mon. Feb. 18

Part 3. External Processes, erosion, transportation, landscape modification and water supply.  Chapters 9, 10, 11, and 12

Topics will include:
        The role of  gravity in mass wasting.
        Running water, rivers and floods.
        Groundwater and water supply.
        Glaciers and glaciation.
THIRD TEST: NOTE CHANGE Wed March 20th (moved from Mon. March 18th)

Part 4: Shorelines, Crustal Deformation, Earthquakes and the Earth's Interior: Chapters 13, 14, 15,16 and 17
Topics will include:
        Deserts, winds and climate
        The nature of erosion and deposition along shorelines.
        Crustal deformation
        Earthquakes
   
    The earth's interior
http://www.usgs.gov
A good site for earthquake information around the world
The Earth's interior
FOURTH TEST: NOTE CHANGE Wednesday April 10th. (moved from Monday April 8th) 

Part 5: The major features of the earth's crust, the driving mechanism, fuel and mineral resources  : Chapters 18, 19, 20 & 21 
Topics will include:
        Plate Tectonics
        The origin of the ocean basins.
        The origin of continents and mountain ranges.
        Natural resources, minerals, fuels and their geologic setting.

The other planets, Chapter 22 will be omitted

FINAL EXAMINATION: Monday April 29th 3:00-5:00 PM 
IN ROOM 128 NATURAL
SCIENCES.

Laboratory Section.

 

Read the exercises BEFORE coming to class and hand in any written work associated with the reading at the beginning  of the class.  This will help you to do the lab. exercises and it will help you at examination time.  If you are having difficulty with the material look up the appropriate chapter in the lecture section textbook, it may have some extra information.  Make sure that you let your instructor know if you are having difficulties, go to office hours or make an appointment.  If this does not help contact Dr. Cambray.  Use the phone or email, the latter is most effective.  If you don't let us know you are in difficulty we cannot help you, don't wait until disaster is looming!

MAKE UP POLICY FOR THE LABS.

If you know you are going to miss a lab. contact your instructor in advance and arrange to attend another lab. in the same week.  If you are in the last lab. that week make it up during the TA's office hours.  If you do not make up the lab. as stated above we need a written explanation covering your absence, e.g. a doctors note otherwise you will not be able to make up the lab. and you will not receive a grade for it.

The lab. is designed to be a hands on learning experience and will involve collaborative learning.  This means that you are expected to discuss the questions amongst yourselves and with the instructor.  The instructor is not there to list the answers for you, but to help you work them out.  

    Do discuss the questions openly with your lab. partners and the instructor, this is not cheating.

    Do not copy your partners work or let them copy yours,
 
this is cheating.

Hand in your own written interpretation of the answers and calculations AT THE END OF EACH LAB UNLESS THE TEACHING ASSISTANT STATES OTHERWISE.

CHEATING WILL RESULT IN A 0.0 FOR THE COURSE.

 

 

TEXTS: Exercises in Physical Geology, Hamblin and Howard (1999).
               Geological Sciences 201 Laboratory Exercises, David T. Long.

Labs will begin in the first week of the semester on Monday, January 7th.  

All laboratories and lab. tests will be in room 316 Natural Sciences.
Section 1 Monday,         10:20 AM-12:10 PM            Jen McGuire, COORDINATOR
Section 2 Monday,         12:40-2:30 PM                   Jennifer Wade
Section 3 Monday,         5:00-6:50 PM                     Jennifer Wade
Section 4 Tuesday,        8:00-9:50 AM                     Jennifer Wade
Section 5 Tuesday,        12:40-2:30 PM                    Erin Rasmusson
Section 6 Tuesday         3:00-4:50 PM                     Jen McGuire, COORDINATOR

Week                                         Lab.# (Long Text)
1   Minerals                                                              5
2  Introduction and Topographic Maps      9
3  No lab. Monday Jan. 21st,  Martin Luther King Day
    The Tuesday, Jan. 22nd, labs will be open for anyone needing help completing the first weeks lab.                                             

4  Igneous Rocks                                  3
5  Volcanoes                                       10
6  Sedimentary and Metamorphic Rocks    7
FIRST LAB. EXAM: Week of February 18 In 316 Nat. Sci at regular lab. times
8  Geologic Time                                    2


  SPRING BREAK March 4-8

10  Running Water                                13 
11 Red Cedar Lab.
12  Underground Water                          11
13  Ice                                                 12
14  Earth Deformation                              1                          
15  Plate Tectonics                                   6

16 LAB. FINAL: Week of April 22 In 316 Nat. Sci. at regular lab. times

             

                

GRADES will be assigned as follows:
                    Lecture section = 70%.
                    Best 3 out of 4 tests, each test worth 15% = 45% of the grade
                    Final worth 25% of the grade.

                    Lab. Exercises and exams associated with the laboratory section = 30% 
                    of the grade
                    Each lab. is worth 100 points and the lab. tests are worth 200 points each
                    Extra credit, 10 points per laboratory can be gained by completing the 
                    Web exercises.
                    50 points can be gained by completing the rates exercises in appendix lll.

Grade scale:              
                   90% and above = 4.0  
                   85%-89% = 3.5  
                   80%-84% = 3.0 
                   75%-79% = 2.5
           70%-74% = 2.0                         THIS SCALE IS THE CURVE
           65%-69% = 1.5
           60%-64% = 1.0
           Less than 60% = 0.0
                   


If you are unable to take a test, for whatever reason, this
will be counted as your lowest grade and dropped.
THERE ARE NO MAKE UP TESTS

 

CHEATING WILL RESULT IN A 0.0 GRADE FOR THE CLASS

With respect to study guides
The text book is very well laid out and has sections at the end of each chapter entitled:
CHAPTER SUMMARY
KEY TERMS
REVIEW QUESTIONS
WEB RESOURCES

If you base your study habits on taking good notes, reading the text book and then completing the exercises at end of each chapter it will help you to learn and understand the material. Do not use colored outline pens, it is a form of self deception. If you want to remember a particular item from the book, make notes on it, adding your own thoughts about the significance and of the passage and it's relation to other material in the course.

IN ADDITION, USE THE OFFICE HOURS BEFORE AN EXAM,

NOT AFTER YOU HAVE BOMBED IT!

Despite what you may have been told elsewhere, memory is an important part of developing an understanding of any subject, practice using yours in this course. It is not possible to cram all the material into your head at the last minute. Even if this has been somewhat successful for you in the past you will do much better if you study the material carefully as it is presented in class (or preferably start studying it before the class).

Taking your own notes achieves several things for you.

1) It helps you to concentrate on the material.
2) It provides you with a record from which to review each class.
3) It develops a very useful personal skill for your future career.
4) It is not the same as recording a lecture (which you are free to do).

If you tape record a lecture, which you are welcome to do,  it takes the same length of time to review it as it did to listen to it the first time. Good note taking skills, which can be developed with practice, will allow you to review a lecture which took 50 minutes in less that 10 minutes, in the long run it is an efficient process and it is an invaluable aid to studying at exam time. I will also be a great help to you to be able to take notes during seminars and meetings in your future professional life, practice now!

In the past I have reviewed the notes offered for sale, without my permission, that are supposed to represent the material covered in this class.   The product is hopelessly inadequate and I recommend that you save your money.   Learn to take your own notes and form a relationship with a fellow classmate to share notes in the case of unexpected absences.